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Potential severe weather is just a fact of life in East Texas. With the change of seasons underway, each spring we can and do experience different types of weather and today is no different.

The Storm Prediction Center rates the severity of storms on a scale of 1 to 5. From general thunderstorms up to a 5, with five being a high risk of severe weather. Today through this evening portions of East Texas are under a level 3, or enhanced risk of severe weather which could include damaging wind gusts, large hail and the potential for a strong tornado.

KLTV 7 Meteorologist Katie Vossler says storms will form later this afternoon and evening along I-35 and begin moving eastward and could be in the western portions of East Texas around 6 or 8 this evening. That is where the greatest risk of severe weather is going to be today according to the Storm Prediction Center. But all of East Texas is at risk of experiencing severe weather at some point.

KLTV 7
KLTV 7
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The storms will continue moving through the area and clear out of East Texas around midnight. However, we will not be done with the potential for severe weather until Wednesday morning.

KLTV 7
KLTV 7
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As a cold front moves into the area, the enhanced risk of severe weather moves to the north and eastern counties in East Texas Thursday morning and they too will have a chance of strong thunderstorms, high winds, possible large hail and a tornado as this cold front moves through.

The front will continue to push east and southward and will be out of East Texas by late afternoon Wednesday.

Storm Prediction Center / National Weather Service
Storm Prediction Center / National Weather Service
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When it comes to this weekend's Easter forecast, it's looking great for now. Sunny to partly cloudy skies for Easter Sunday with just a 10% chance of rain and a comfortable high of 78.

Stay weather aware this afternoon through tomorrow.

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