Despite the fact that more and more drugs are getting legalized across the country, drug dealers are still working hard to try to outsmart law enforcement to move the dope that's still illegal and the feds just busted a shipment of meth that was headed to East Texas and you gotta admit, this plan was pretty ingenious.

According to a press release from the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Customs and Border Protection Officers were at an express consignment hub in Memphis, Tennessee when they examined a shipment manifested as “REGIONAL BREAD ROASTED PEANUTS REGIONAL DUST SWEET MADE OF CORN." The shipment was going from Mexico to East Texas.

But the officers put an x-ray to the shipment and found something strange. The shipment contained bags of peanuts and other food preparation materials.

Officers cracked open the peanuts and a white crystal substance was found concealed in the shells. A sample of the substance was tested and came back as Methamphetamine. CBP officers posted a photo of the seizure to Twitter with the tweet "Anybody want a peanut!?" quoting the movie "The Princess Bride".


The total weight of the methamphetamine was 489 grams and its being held by CBP while awaiting destruction according to the CBP press release.

Somebody is out of 400 grams of meth and I'm quite sure they will go "nuts" behind it.

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Stacker compiled a list of the best places to live in Texas using data from Niche. Niche ranks places to live based on a variety of factors including cost of living, schools, health care, recreation, and weather. Cities, suburbs, and towns were included. Listings and images are from realtor.com.

On the list, there's a robust mix of offerings from great schools and nightlife to high walkability and public parks. Some areas have enjoyed rapid growth thanks to new businesses moving to the area, while others offer glimpses into area history with well-preserved architecture and museums. Keep reading to see if your hometown made the list.

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