I have been seeing a lot of articles popping up about the coin shortage in America. It's even hit the East Texas area. Have you heard about this?

I saw somewhere that the local Kroger's cashiers will stop giving out coins at the checkout lane. My first thought was, "Are we moving to the age of digital currency? Isn't that supposed to be part of the great Apocalypse or something?"

Apparently, since the rise of the coronavirus pandemic, retailers haven't been bringing in as much money due to the shut down of most United States businesses not considered "essential". This means not as many coins and cash currency has been flowing through the local economies.

I have a question. Can't we just go to our local banks and request a bunch of money in coins? Wouldn't the United States Treasury be able to help us out? Isn't there a central bank everybody can go to for coins? (Maybe it's hidden down deep below the U.S. Capitol Building within a secret tomb, like in the movie, National Treasure?)

I just did a little research and it's the Federal Reserve that I am thinking of, but they, too, are facing a great coin shortage.

So how are local stores handling the change we are supposed to be receiving out of dollars when we buy stuff at the store? Kroger's says they are going to start passing the change savings on to customer "loyalty cards." Other stores are asking customers to "round up" their change to the nearest dollar so that they don't have to deal with giving out coins.

The Great Coin Shortage of 2020 is even affecting Walmart. Now you know when the Walmarts start to run out of coins, we're looking at a major problem! Yikes.

I have an even bigger question. I live in an apartment complex that has its own laundry room, so if there is a shortage of coins, especially quarters, then how in the HECK am I supposed to do my laundry?!